Hickman & Lowder Weblog

Beware Before You Sign – Avoiding the Trips and Traps of a Long Term Care Admission Agreement

Tuesday, 02 February 2016 15:26

docsLately, I’ve seen several clients who have come to us too late. They were presented with an admission agreement for a nursing home or other care facility and were told that the agreement needed to be signed “right away.” This can be an expensive mistake.

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When is Modified Curriculum Appropriate and How Modified Should it Be?

Tuesday, 26 January 2016 12:55

classroomIs your child’s IQ is well below average? Does your child’s IEP exempt your child from standardized tests or note that she should take modified assessments? Is she “pulled out” into a resource room for any academic subject, such as Math or Language Arts? Is it clear from her homework that she is unable to learn at the same depth or speed as her typical peers? If your answer to any of these questions is “Yes,” then ask the IEP Team if your child should be receiving a modified curriculum, and then ask them to identify what grade level curriculum she should be receiving.

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Divorce and Families with Special Needs

Thursday, 03 December 2015 09:18

ropeDivorces and child support issues can be complicated and stressful. Aside from the personal conflict and strife associated with these issues, the laws governing this area of practice are complex. Unfortunately, family law attorneys, and even judges, may not know how their area of law interplays with public benefits and affects people with disabilities. If you or your child has special needs and your family faces these issues, here is some basic information to keep in mind.

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Supreme Court of Ohio Decides: Home Titled in Revocable Trust is Not an Exempt Asset for Medicaid

Thursday, 22 October 2015 10:30

houseRecently, the Supreme Court of Ohio ruled that a home that is titled in a couple’s revocable living trust after one spouse enters a nursing home cannot be transferred to the spouse that remains in the community and be an exempt asset for Medicaid purposes. The Court stated, “We agree with the state that during the period between an application for Medicaid benefits and the notice of Medicaid approval… the community spouse must make any amount above his or her CSRA available to the institutionalized spouse.”

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